Friday, July 8, 2011

REVIEWS: DEATH CAB FOR A CUTIE - CODES & KEYS

"Codes & Keys"

Artist: Death Cab For A Cutie 
Title: Codes And Keys 
Year: 2011 
Genre: Indie Rock 
Rate: 5,5 

There’s something to be said about Ben Gibbard’s transformation from a Built to Spill-loving Northwestern weepie to indie rock’s poet laureate. Death Cab for Cutie, for all their splendid musicianship and Chris Walla’s knack for evolving their sound, have always been about Gibbard. Gibbard, bemoaning a meaningless relationship in “Tiny Vessels” or articulating that eternal feeling of moving on that “Photobooth” spoke to so clearly, always so straightforward with his lyrical bloodletting but talented with his knives. 

Gibbard made self-flagellation and depression and that universal feeling of not always getting what you want an art instead of a blunt instrument, and that was always the key behind Death Cab’s success. It’s what led to them being erroneously labeled “emo” by the mainstream media after Plans’ success, what led to massive, unyielding popularity for a band that otherwise would have just been another number in a “best-of-the-00s” compilation. 

Even as their sound expanded and swelled, as major label budgets tend to cause, Gibbard remained the constant: evocative, steadfast, and preternaturally attuned to the hopes and fears of insecure youth. On Codes and Keys, Death Cab take that constant and make it just another cog in a sound that remains progressive yet coldly distant.

Track List: 1. Home Is a Fire; 2. Codes and Keys; 3. Some Boys; 4. Doors Unlocked and Open; 5. You are a Tourist; 6. Unobstructed Views; 7. Monday Morning; 8. Portable Television; 9. Underneath the Sycamore; 10. St. Peter's Cathedral; 11. Stay Young, Go Dancing.


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